Schedule an Appointment

Latest Vital Health Articles

By vitalhf, Oct 3 2018 02:00PM

By Holly A. Carling, O.M.D., L.Ac., Ph.D.


What is a “Health Detective” and what does she do? When someone is sick, there is a reason for it. The body doesn’t just suddenly decide “Hey! I have nothing else to do today, maybe I’ll make my immune system go haywire, or maybe I’ll just make the heart shut down, or just for kicks, I'm gonna give this person a migraine!” It doesn’t happen that way. Although the easy fix is to take a drug to suppress the immune system, bring a damaged heart back to quasi functioning (with drugs), or stop the migraine with another drug, that isn’t identifying what went wrong.


If you believe in the body’s innate ability to heal itself and you believe in the body’s intelligence, you probably already know that there is an error in the mechanism somewhere. But where? Some answers are easy and obvious, mostly they aren’t. That’s where the health detective comes in.


The most important question for a health detective to ask is WHY? Nothing in the body happens for no reason. Good or bad, if there is a symptom, the body is trying to accomplish something or warn you of something. It’s up to us to interpret it.


Continue Reading...

By vitalhf, Sep 26 2018 02:00PM

By Dr. Holly A. Carling, O.M.D., L.Ac., Ph.D.


Way too commonly people are full of hot air. That air may come out your mouth in the way of belching or burping, or out your back end as gas or flatulence (and a few other nicknames). Although a minor amount of gas is normal, there comes a time when the excess build-up is not only uncomfortable, but an indication that something is wrong in your digestive tract.


Continue Reading...

By vitalhf, Sep 19 2018 01:00PM

By Dr. Holly A. Carling, O.M.D., L.Ac., Ph.D.


“Wow! My face is on fire!” Menopause or peri-menopausal hot flashes, sweats, moodiness, rapid heart beat, and alternating hot and cold feelings are no fun. If it was just feeling hot, that would be one thing. We all get too hot at various times of our lives. But hot flashes are different. Many times they are also associated with feeling sick - flu-like - just before the onset. It is generally localized and intense in the face, chest or even legs, and it’s difficult to cool down.


One day, years ago, I was driving barely over the speed limit, but aware that it felt frantic. I caught myself and questioned what was going on in my head. I realized I was looking for a snow bank to bury my face in! “Oh my gosh! Was that a hot flash?” That was my first experience. I imagined myself explaining that to a police officer if I had been pulled over and the embarrassed thought alone made me have another hot flash!


Well, I decided then and there that I was not going to do this! I immediately took a look at what was wrong in my lifestyle. I treat menopause often in practice, but now that it was happening to me, it was time to look at my own medicine.


Continue Reading...



By vitalhf, Sep 12 2018 01:00PM

By Dr. Holly A. Carling, O.M.D., L.Ac., Ph.D.


If a tree in your yard or a flower in your garden suddenly died or was sick, would you just chop it down or pluck it out and throw it away? Or would you take it somewhere (such as the University of Idaho Extension Office Master Gardener Clinic) to find out WHY it is sick or dying and try to rescue it? If your car stopped running, or was making some horrible sound, would you just take it to a junk yard and dispose of it? Or would you take it to a mechanic for a diagnostic workup? Would you be happy if they just duct-taped it together and said, “you’re good to go!”? If not, why do that to your body? The number one question you should always be asking is “WHY?”


Don’t be satisfied with a duct-tape approach, and don’t be satisfied with “you’re just aging”. Everything that goes awry in the body has a “WHY”. There is a reason – usually a multitude of reasons – WHY it is behaving the way it is.


Continue Reading...

By vitalhf, Sep 5 2018 01:00PM

By Dr. Holly A. Carling, O.M.D., L.Ac., Ph.D.


Brain fog is an increasing concern for many people. Definitions for brain fog vary a bit, but for the most part it includes the following: mental cloudiness, feeling like a veil is over the brain, forgetfulness, being easily distracted or difficulty concentrating, mild confusion, sometimes you have to stop for your brain to “engage”, easily overwhelmed, getting lost easily, forgetting where you put things, difficulty following directions or following a line of thought, temporary disorientation, etc. It is common with certain illnesses, such as “fibro-fog” associated with fibromyalgia. It is also associated with several classes of medications, with insomnia or sleep deprivation for any reason, auto-immune diseases and many more. The gist of it is that your brain feels like it is cloudy. This is different from dementia which several of the above symptoms can also be associated with.


Sometimes for fun I like to refer to it as brain “smog”, because it can be caused by junk in the diet. “Smog” is fog plus pollutants in the air. In the case of “brain smog” it is fog brought on by pollutants in the diet. The good news is that just as a good strong wind and environmental consciousness can reduce smog in the air, a good detox and conscious awareness of what you are ingesting can help clear up your mental fog.


Continue Reading...

Holly Button PNG