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Latest Vital Health Articles

By vitalhf, Oct 9 2019 01:00PM

By Holly A. Carling, O.M.D., L.Ac., Ph.D.


Everything we hear about stomach acid is that it is “bad” for you. Medicines abound that help sop it up or stop the body as much as possible from producing it. But what if we are wrong? What if what we are doing to control it is the exact OPPOSITE of what we should be doing? What if we allow the burning to just go on?


Let’s handle the last question first. Don’t do that. Chronic heartburn is nothing to mess with. The long-term ramifications could be serious and it cannot be ignored. Serious not only from the possibility of developing Barrett’s Esophagus or cancer, but serious because of the nutritional deficiencies that are causing a slow degradation of function in your body. This is due to the inability to breakdown and absorb nutrients that are critical to repair and growth of tissue, and are needed to make hormones, enzymes, cells and other important physiological components in the body. Further, every organ in the body has a mineral that it is dependent upon for function, and in the absence of it, cannot perform up to par. It’s like putting cheap gas in your car. Your car will still run, howbeit that it may sputter, chug and lurch and just not perform with the efficiency expected. Why would we expect the body, when nutrients are not available for function, to perform any differently?


Our bodies NEED acid in the stomach.


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By vitalhf, Sep 25 2019 01:00PM

By Jonathan M. Sasser, M.S.O.M., L.Ac.


Genetics have long been discussed in ways that seem to indicate that they determine our fate. Our DNA tends to be thought of as this fixed set of information that is passed down to us from our parents (and it is for the most part). But, did you know that our bodies have several mechanisms in play to control how our genes are expressed? The purpose of our DNA is to serve as the code for creating the many proteins necessary for life. According to the National Institute of Health, there are an estimated 20,000-25,000 genes encoding the various proteins that serve to regulate chemical reactions, control the movement of nutrients, create the physical structure of our bodies, and perform countless other functions. In much the same way you adjust the volume when you do or don’t like what you hear, the epigenetic mechanisms in our cells increase the activity of certain genes when we need more of the corresponding protein, and they turn down the genes corresponding to proteins that are needed less.


When we talk of our family histories and our predispositions to certain conditions and diseases, we need to remind ourselves not to put too much stake in the word, ‘predisposition’. A predisposition is merely a tendency, it is the leaning of a statistical observation one way or another, but it by no means guarantees our future.


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By vitalhf, Sep 18 2019 03:00PM

By Holly A. Carling, O.M.D., L.Ac., Ph.D.


Have you ever felt like you had a thyroid issue and your doctor runs a test, usually just a TSH, and says your thyroid is “okay”? Frustrating isn’t it? I’ve seen many people come in with just that story – they have a plethora of symptoms that appear to reveal an abnormal functioning thyroid – but doc says “no”.


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By vitalhf, Sep 11 2019 03:00PM

By Jonathan M. Sasser, M.S.O.M., L.Ac.


The adrenal glands are best known for producing and releasing epinephrine (adrenaline) and other hormones involved in the fight or flight response, but they also produce a number of other hormones that deliver instructions and information to nearly every tissue and organ in your body. These instructions play a role in everything from regulating our blood pressure and blood sugar to our sleep cycle and the production of our sex hormones, among other things. Three absolutely critical regulatory endocrine glands, the hypothalamus, pituitary and thyroid, are very closely connected to the adrenal glands through various feedback mechanisms.


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By vitalhf, Sep 9 2019 03:22PM

By Holly A. Carling, O.M.D., L.Ac., Ph.D.


Thyroid disease is generally insidious – it generally comes on slowly and can take years before it manifests enough to take action. Left unchecked, it can be serious. Both hypothyroid (low functioning thyroid) and hyperthyroid (over-active thyroid) can cause many problems and should not be ignored.


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